Tajima Pikes Peak
Tajima Pikes Peak
Tajima Pikes Peak

Remember last year when we covered the incredible electric vehicle (EV) battle at Pikes Peak 2013 for Mitsubishi? Not only did Lightning Motorcycle put 21 seconds in front of the best gasoline motorcycle, but Mitsubishi lost out to Tajima, mostly due to bad weather. Although Tajima swore he wouldn’t come back, it seems he changed his mind… again.

Tajima is back at Pikes Peak

Pikes Peak is one of the greatest races of the year. This incredible hill climb gathers carmakers and local racers in a frenetic race to the top of the clouds. The elevation from the start line at 4,720 ft (1,440 m) to the finish line at 14,110 ft (4,300 m) seriously hinders gasoline engines struggling to take in more air. The reach the top with 33% less power than they made at the bottom. This means those internal combustion engines (ICE) can only be tweaked for part of the race, excelling only at part of the way. Electric cars and motorcycle suffer no such consequences. An electric knows only two things: torque on, torque off.

Larger than life Tajima left for his victory last year with good weather, leaving the competition behind to struggle with rain and a very wet, and icy surface. If Toyota was surprised by Mitsubishi’s incredible effort, all three vehicles approached the hill climb with different philosophies. Tajima’s Suzuki is a lot of power and a potent battery pack. Toyota’s TMG P002 went the light way, while Mitsubishi had the right balance, at least on paper. This year, the competition will be fierce. Toyota will probably come back with a vengeance, and Tajima will have a very hungry Mitsubishi to ward off. As far as electric motorcycles, Lightning Motorcycle knows it too, will have competition.

Press Release:

Colorado Springs, April 9——After winning the high-profile Unlimited Division nine times, including six straight from 2006-2011 in a variety of high-powered Suzuki sport autos, it remains a great story that he has switched to the Electrics in The Broadmoor Pikes Peak International Hill Climb for the third straight year.

The renowned Japanese star, who was the first competitor to break the once unthinkable 10-minute mark when he achieved the honor in 2011 when he drove his Suzuki SX4 to the summit of America’s Mountain in 9:51.278, will be back on June 29 in his Tajima Motor E-Runner model in the now highly competitive Electric Modified Division.

His legion of fans were stunned when his first attempt in an Electric auto failed in 2012 when his model was forced out by a fire.

But last year, he showed that he is still a champion and King of the Mountain hopeful once again when he drove his Tajima Monster Sport Special electric auto to a blazing time of 9:46.530, the 7th fastest time in the history of America’s second-oldest motor sports race behind the Indy 500.

Nicknamed “Monster” by fans and foes alike, the 63-year old driver shows no sign of retiring from the PPIHC any time soon, and that’s great news for fans who will be on the course again this year to watch the famed auto-motorcycle classic.

He made his racing debut in 1968 in the All-Japan Dirt Trial Championship where he won his first race. In 1983, he established Monster Sports International, a motorsport preparation shop. In 1986 he established Suzuki Sport and returned to the World Rally scene where he competed driving a Suzuki Cultus in the Olympus Rally.

In all, he has taken nine All Japan Dirt Trial Championship titles, four WRC Championship class wins, two class wins in the Asia-Pacific Rally Championships, and his ten Pikes Peak crowns.

But, most of all, he’s etched his name in motor sports history in The Broadmoor Pikes Peak International Hill Climb, where he will once again climb aboard his latest entry and go for broke and another new record over the 12.42-mile, 156-turn course that ends at 14,110 feet, a familiar hangout for The Monster.

Colorado Springs, April 9——After winning the high-profile Unlimited Division nine times, including six straight from 2006-2011 in a variety of high-powered Suzuki sport autos, it remains a great story that he has switched to the Electrics in The Broadmoor Pikes Peak International Hill Climb for the third straight year.

 

The renowned Japanese star, who was the first competitor to break the once unthinkable 10-minute mark when he achieved the honor in 2011 when he drove his Suzuki SX4 to the summit of America’s Mountain in 9:51.278, will be back on June 29 in his Tajima Motor E-Runner model in the now highly competitive Electric Modified Division.

 

His legion of fans were stunned when his first attempt in an Electric auto failed in 2012 when his model was forced out by a fire.

 

But last year, he showed that he is still a champion and King of the Mountain hopeful once again when he drove his Tajima Monster Sport Special electric auto to a blazing time of 9:46.530, the 7th fastest time in the history of America’s second-oldest motor sports race behind the Indy 500.

 

Nicknamed “Monster” by fans and foes alike, the 63-year old driver shows no sign of retiring from the PPIHC any time soon, and that’s great news for fans who will be on the course again this year to watch the famed auto-motorcycle classic.

 

He made his racing debut in 1968 in the All-Japan Dirt Trial Championship where he won his first race. In 1983, he established Monster Sports International, a motorsport preparation shop. In 1986 he established Suzuki Sport and returned to the World Rally scene where he competed driving a Suzuki Cultus in the Olympus Rally.

 

In all, he has taken nine All Japan Dirt Trial Championship titles, four WRC Championship class wins, two class wins in the Asia-Pacific Rally Championships, and his ten Pikes Peak crowns.

 

 

But, most of all, he’s etched his name in motor sports history in The Broadmoor Pikes Peak International Hill Climb, where he will once again climb aboard his latest entry and go for broke and another new record over the 12.42-mile, 156-turn course that ends at 14,110 feet, a familiar hangout for The Monster.

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Born and raised around classic cars, it wasn't until Nicolas drove an AC Proulsion eBox and a Tesla Roadster that the light went on. Eager to spread the news about those amazing full torque electric vehicles, he started writing about this amazing technology and its social impacts in 2007. Today, Nicolas covers renewable energy, test drives cars, does podcasts and films. Nicolas offers an in-depth look at the e-mobility world through interviews and the many contacts he made in those industries. His articles are also published on Teslrati, CleanTechnica, the Beverly Hills Car Club and Medium. "There are more solutions than obstacles." Nicolas Zart

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