Full-Scale McLaren Senna Made From Legos

A full 1:1 scale Lego McLaren Senna from the McLaren Ultimate Series has been unveiled. The interactive Lego model has a full interior as well, allowing someone to get inside and sit in a production McLaren seat. Grasping a McLaren Senna steering wheel and pressing pedals (a few of the only non-Lego parts included), the “driver” can start the Lego engine.

The Lego McLaren Senna was created in secret and required nearly 5,000 hours of work. There are almost half a million separate components and the whole Lego Senna weighs in at a scale-tipping 1,700 kilograms. About 500 kg more than the actual Senna.

Incorporated into the Lego McLaren Senna are the aforementioned seat and driving instruments as well as speakers that simulate the real Senna’s engine roar when the start button is pressed. Lights and infotainment are also functional.

Lego experts used 467,854 individual pieces to construct the new McLaren. 10 model makers worked in shifts to assemble the car, which took about nine times longer than is required to construct the actual McLaren Senna (300 hours versus 2,725 hours). Adding in design and development time, the Lego Senna took a total of 4,935 hours to build.

The car’s brick-work is finished to replicate Victory Grey with contrasting orange highlights, just like the 15cm-long, 219-piece, McLaren Senna LEGO Speed Champions edition that went on sale earlier this year.

The Lego McLaren Senna will be touring the world at special events globally.

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An automotive enthusiast for most of his adult life, Aaron has worked in and around the industry in many ways. He is an accredited member of the Rocky Mountain Automotive Press (RMAP), the Midwest Automotive Media Association (MAMA), the Texas Auto Writers Association (TAWA), and freelances as a writer and journalist around the Web and in print. You can find his portfolio at AaronOnAutos.com.

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Aaron Turpen
An automotive enthusiast for most of his adult life, Aaron has worked in and around the industry in many ways. He is an accredited member of the Rocky Mountain Automotive Press (RMAP), the Midwest Automotive Media Association (MAMA), the Texas Auto Writers Association (TAWA), and freelances as a writer and journalist around the Web and in print. You can find his portfolio at AaronOnAutos.com.